Migration, community, and collaboration in a changing world

Abstract

 Presenter (s) Blane Harvey, Hannah Chestnutt, and Shaemaa Essa, McGill University
Georgiana Mihut, Economic and Social Research Institute
N. Noor & M. Syed, OISE, University of Toronto
Emilia Soto, University of Sussex
Juthi Jamila, OISE, University of Toronto
 Discussant (s) Vanessa Hughes, London School of Economics (LSE) Fellow in Social Policy
Discussion (zoom) https://tuni.zoom.us/j/634590358 (March 23, 2020 at 9:00-10:30 am EST)

This session includes five presentations on the theme of migration, community, and collaboration in a changing world. It examines issues related to transdisciplinary collaboration on sustainability challenges in higher education, efforts to instill pro-environmental behaviors among corporate employees using psychological theories, and the power of Afro-Pacific music in Colombia for black communities to counter hegemonic discrimination, and programs aiming to overcome bullying in Irish schools, digital storytelling with refugees in formal and non-formal settings. Please listen to the recorded presentations and join us for live session discussion with the authors and the invited discussant Vanessa Hughes, a LSE Fellow in Social Policy:

‘Transdisciplinary Collaboration on Sustainability Challenges: Toward New Approaches for Higher Education Institutions,’ Blane Harvey, Hannah Chestnutt, and Shaemaa Essa, McGill University (see abstract)

‘Identifying Barriers to and Proposing Recommendations for Pro-Environmental Behaviors Among Corporate Employees by Using Psychological Theories’ by Juhti Jamila, OISE, University of Toronto (see abstract)

‘Digital storytelling with refugees in formal and non-formal settings: A comparative spatial analysis’ presented by N. Noor, M. Syed, OISE, University of Toronto (see abstract)

‘Marimba, Territoriality, and Black Identity: The Power of Music in Assimilating and Resisting’ by Emilia Soto, University of Sussex (see abstract)

Bullying in Irish Schools: Testing the Effect of Question Wording and School Diversity on Prevalence Rate,’ presented by Georgiana Mihut, Economic and Social Research Institute (see abstract)

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Transdisciplinary Collaboration on Sustainability Challenges: Toward New Approaches for Higher Education Institutions’ by Blane Harvey, Hannah Chestnutt, and Shaemaa Essa, McGill University

 

‘Identifying Barriers to and Proposing Recommendations for Pro-Environmental Behaviors Among Corporate Employees by Using Psychological Theories’ by Juhti Jamila, OISE, University of Toronto

 

‘Digital storytelling with refugees in formal and non-formal settings: A comparative spatial analysis’  by N. Noor & M. Syed 

 

‘Marimba, Territoriality, and Black Identity: The Power of Music in Assimilating and Resisting’ by Emilia Soto, University of Sussex

 

‘Bullying in Irish Schools: Testing the Effect of Question Wording and School Diversity on Prevalence Rate,’ presented by Georgiana Mihut, Economic and Social Research Institute

 

Presenters

Georgiana Mihut is a postdoctoral researcher at the Economic and Social Research Institute. She received her PhD in Higher Education from Boston College. Her dissertation investigated the impact of university prestige in three national labour markets, using an experimental design. Georgiana has completed the Erasmus Mundus Master’s in Research and Innovation in Higher Education. She also holds an MA in Education and Globalization from University of Oulu and a BA in Political Science from Babes-Bolyai University. Prior to joining ESRI, Georgiana held appointments with multiple organizations, including the Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, the World Bank, and the American Council on Education. She is the author and co-author of books and articles in comparative and international higher education. E-mail: georgiana.g.mihut@gmail.com

Blane Harvey is an Assistant Professor at McGill University’s Department for Integrated Studies in Education and an Associate at the McGill School of Environment. His research studies how climate change knowledge is produced, validated and communicated, and how facilitated learning and knowledge sharing across disciplines can support action on climate change in the global South. He also studies leadership development and education in sustainability, examining the role of power, voice, and participation in international development. Blane is a Research Associate at the Overseas Development Institute (United Kingdom) and Associate Editor for the journals Climate and Development and Evidence and Policy. He can be reached by email at: Blane.Harvey@mcgill.ca, or on Twitter at @BlaneHarvey

Hannah Renée Chestnutt joined the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University as Faculty Lecturer in August 2019. Prior to coming to McGill she graduated from the University of Glasgow with a PhD in Education. Before completing her PhD she was a secondary mathematics and science teacher in Scotland, a middle school teacher in New Jersey, and both an elementary and a secondary teacher in Canada. Her teaching experiences, spanning more than a decade and three different countries, led to her current interest in the use of innovative methodologies such as social network analysis to study collaboration and knowledge co-production within educational contexts. She can be reached at Hannah.Chestnutt@mcgill.ca

Shaemaa Essa is a Master’s student in Educational Leadership at McGill’s Department of Integrated Studies in Education. Her thesis research is examining the implementation of education for sustainable development (ESD) policies at public and private educational institutions in Saudi Arabia. She can be reached at Shaemaa.Essa@mail.mcgill.ca

N. Noor is a Doctor of Education student at OISE, University of Toronto. Her research interests are related to refugee and immigrant resettlement, peace building, and women’s education through arts and technological-based methods. Her work has focused on women’s rights and development, community-based adult education on women’s health and VAW issues, and civic engagement. Email: saeeda.n.noorilahi@gmail.com

Emilia Soto is a Colombian historian and professional in Languages and Cultural Studies with a master in International Education and Development from the University of Sussex, UK. She is currently linked to the Teachers Task Force at UNESCO Paris. Her interests are focused on the role of education to achieve greater inclusion, and how education can guarantee inclusion and equity in a world declared and accepted as diverse, multicultural and intercultural. E-mail: emiliasotoecheverri@gmail.com

Discussant

Vanessa Hughes is a LSE Fellow in Social Policy since September 2019. Previously she was an ESRC-funded doctoral student in Sociology at Goldsmiths College supervised by Professors Les Back and Heidi Mirza, University of London. As part of her doctoral programme she spent two months at the Harvard Graduate School of Education hosted by Professor Roberto G. Gonzales. Before her doctoral studies, Vanessa worked as a researcher at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society at the University of Oxford. In 2015 she co-founded the social enterprice actREAL which brings academic research on social issues into the community by using theatre and performance to bring it to life. Vanessa has also worked for the Council of Europe and the Migrants’ Rights Network. Vanessa’s main research interests are in people’s lived experience of migration, welfare and education policies, with a particular focus on how immigration status produces social inequalities and shapes stratification through restricting access to education and welfare rights. For her doctoral research Vanessa examined how precarious immigration status, race and life course shapes young migrants’ everyday life in London and produces simultaneous exclusion and exclusion at different scales and times and long-term uncertainty over their future. She is also interested in working with qualitative participatory methods and in a collaborative process with research participants. Her interest in participatory methods extends to her teaching approach, where she incorporates innovative and creative activities to offer a variety of learning experiences. Vanessa’s current research looks at the intersection of immigration status and time, and immigration status and education in shaping young people’s lives and to gain an understanding of how hierarchies are shaped within the UK immigration system. She co-edited a recent special issue of the Graduate Journal of Social Science, co-edited the book Citizenship and Its Others with Professor Bridget Anderson, and published articles in the journals Refuge, International Studies in Sociology of Education and the European Human Rights Law Review. Vanessa also co-authored the research reports ‘Outside and In: Legal Entitlements to Health Care and Education for Migrants with Irregular Status in Europe’ with Dr Sarah Spencer and ‘No Way Out No Way in. Irregular migrant children and families in the UK’ with Dr Nando Sigona.

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